Health – Chatham Journal Newspaper http://chathamjournal.com Experience the World of Chatham County, NC Thu, 11 Jan 2018 22:25:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://i1.wp.com/chathamjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/10888465-four-newspaper-pile-isolated-on-white-background-Stock-Vector-newspaper-icon-headline-5580d7a0v1_site_icon.png?fit=32%2C32 Health – Chatham Journal Newspaper http://chathamjournal.com 32 32 Experience the World of Chatham County, NC Health – Chatham Journal Newspaper Experience the World of Chatham County, NC Health – Chatham Journal Newspaper http://chathamjournal.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://chathamjournal.com/category/living/health/ TV-G 63016882 Register now for the Chatham County CERT course coming in February http://chathamjournal.com/2018/01/08/register-now-chatham-county-cert-course/ Mon, 08 Jan 2018 16:47:11 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=8291 Pittsboro, NC – Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) is a national program that educates volunteers about disaster preparedness for the hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search…

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Pittsboro, NC – Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) is a national program that educates volunteers about disaster preparedness for the hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. CERT offers a consistent, nationwide approach to volunteer training and organization that professional responders can rely on during disaster situations, which allows them to focus on more complex tasks. Through CERT, the capabilities to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters is built and enhanced.

FEMA’s Community Emergency Response Team Program trains volunteers to prepare for the types of disasters that their community may face. Through hands-on practice and realistic exercises, CERT members:

    • Learn how to safely respond to manmade and natural hazards
    • Help organize basic disaster response
    • Promote preparedness by hosting and participating in community events

To everyone who has expressed or may have interest in Chatham County CERT training – the first CERT class has been scheduled. There is no cost for the class.

The CERT class is 2 1/2 days long. Dates are:
Wed, Feb 28 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thu, Mar 01 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Fri, Mar 02, 9:00 AM – 12:00 noon

Location:
Chatham Co Agriculture & Conference Center
1192 US 64 W Business, Pittsboro, NC 27312
Please register at this link.

FMI: Email Terry Schmidt at *protected email*or call 919-642-3721

 

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Courts order tobacco companies to run ads about their products http://chathamjournal.com/2018/01/03/courts-order-tobacco-companies-run-ads-products/ Wed, 03 Jan 2018 22:34:38 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=8249 by Shannon Kincaide Godbout Pittsboro, NC – Starting November 26, 2017, the major U.S. tobacco companies began running ads in newspapers in NC and nationally telling the American people the known facts about the deadly consequences of smoking and secondhand…

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by Shannon Kincaide Godbout

Pittsboro, NC – Starting November 26, 2017, the major U.S. tobacco companies began running ads in newspapers in NC and nationally telling the American people the known facts about the deadly consequences of smoking and secondhand smoke.

Official U.S. documents show that a federal court in 2006 ordered the companies to make these statements after finding the companies guilty of breaking civil racketeering laws and making misrepresentations to the public about the dangers of smoking and how some ads are marketed to children. The ads will run after 11 years of appeals by the tobacco companies, who successfully fought to remove the phrase “here is the truth” from the corrective statements, which would have implied that the industry deliberately deceived the public.

Many public health advocates in NC welcome the corrective statement ads, citing that they will focus attention on the enormous public health problem caused by tobacco use and the need for strong action to save lives. To reduce tobacco use, advocates are ready to partner with state-wide officials to address four evidence-based measures to reduce tobacco use, especially by teens:  1) raise the age of sale of tobacco products to 21; 2) adopt strengthened smoke-free laws and policies; 3) increase the price of cigarettes by at least $1.50 per pack; and 4) strengthen the funding for state and local tobacco prevention and cessation programming.

“We have seen the positive impact that our county’s tobacco-free policy has had on our staff and the public,” said Chatham County Health Director Layton Long. “Tobacco-free policies play a large part in helping people quit, and for those who have successfully quit, quitting for good. These policies set a positive example for our youth and also help reduce exposure to secondhand smoke when visitors come to our offices. We hope that these ads will serve as a reminder that tobacco and its byproducts are hazardous to our health and that we need to continue to support prevention and cessation programs.”

According to the NC Youth Tobacco Survey (2015), in NC alone, 9.3 percent of high school students still smoke and nearly 16.8% use electronic cigarettes (http://bit.ly/2CkKZ4m).  According to the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids, tobacco use claims 14,200 NC lives and costs the state $3.81 billion in health care bills annually (http://bit.ly/2B1ieZW).

“For too many years, the public health community has known and seen the dangerous effects that tobacco has on our youth,” said Long. “We hope that these statements from the tobacco companies will send a clear message to our youth that all tobacco products, including new products like electronic cigarettes, are dangerous, addictive, and ultimately lead to disease and early death.”

In 1999, the U.S. Department of Justice sued the major cigarette manufacturers, charging they had violated the civil provisions of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) and other laws. Tobacco company defendants in the case include Altria, its Philip Morris USA subsidiary, and R.J. Reynolds.

On Aug. 17, 2006, U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler issued her verdict against the companies.

Judge Kessler ordered the tobacco companies to publish corrective statements on five topics, stating they had deliberately deceived the public:

  • the adverse health effects of smoking;
  • addictiveness of smoking and nicotine;
  • lack of significant health benefit from smoking “low tar,” “light,” “ultra light,” “mild,” and “natural” cigarettes (products that have been deceptively marketed as less harmful than regular cigarettes);
  • manipulation of cigarette design and composition to ensure optimum nicotine delivery; and
  • adverse health effects of exposure to secondhand smoke.

The corrective statement ads started running November 26, 2017, in print and online in about 50 newspapers specified by the court. They will also run during prime time on the major television networks for one year. The tobacco companies must also publish the corrective statements on their websites and cigarette packs; according to national networks, implementation details are still being finalized.

The corrective statement newspaper ads must run in the front section of Sunday newspapers on November 26, 2017; December 10, 2017; January 7, 2018; February 4, 2018; and March 4, 2018. In NC, corrective statements will appear in the Charlotte Observer. Per the judge’s order, corrective statements will also appear in USA Today and the Wall Street Journal. The tobacco companies will pay the entire cost of running the ads.

Despite significant progress in reducing smoking, tobacco use is still the leading preventable cause of death and disease in the United States, killing more than 480,000 Americans and costing the nation about $170 billion in health care expenses each year.

Support is available for those interested in quitting tobacco. The Chatham County Public Health Department is offering free tobacco cessation classes this January for any Chatham County resident, employee, and their family members. Participants will receive a free QuitSmart Stop Smoking Kit and two weeks of nicotine replacement therapy. These free sessions will be held from 5:30 pm-6:45 pm on January 17th, January 29th, and January 31st. There will also be an informational session held on January 10th to learn more about the QuitSmart program. All sessions will be held at the Chatham County Public Health Department in Pittsboro (80 East Street). Contact Anna Stormzand at *protected email* (919-545-8445) to reserve your spot or for more information.

QuitlineNC is also a free cessation resource and is available 24 hours a day to assist individuals quitting tobacco. Call toll-free 1 800-QUIT-NOW or visit www.quitlinenc.org.

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Lyme disease support group holding organizational meeting on January 20 http://chathamjournal.com/2018/01/01/lyme-disease-support-group-holding-organizational-meeting-january-20/ Tue, 02 Jan 2018 04:52:51 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=8205 Pittsboro, NC – Lyme disease, the potentially debilitating tick-borne illness, is on the rise in North Carolina. The state Department of Health and Human Services reported 30 confirmed and 236 probable cases of Lyme disease last year. In 2011 there were…

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Pittsboro, NC – Lyme disease, the potentially debilitating tick-borne illness, is on the rise in North Carolina.

The state Department of Health and Human Services reported 30 confirmed and 236 probable cases of Lyme disease last year. In 2011 there were fewer than 100 cases in the state.

Lyme disease is caused by bacteria spread by infected deer ticks, also known as black-legged ticks. Deer ticks are small, dark-colored and typically inhabit areas with tall grass, bushes, deep woods and/or fallen leaves. Not all deer ticks carry the Lyme disease bacteria.

Brown’s Chapel United Methodist Church has been approached by a Lyme activist in the local community to help organize a Lyme Disease Support Group in Chatham County starting in 2018.  There will be an organizational meeting on Saturday, January 20 from 10:30 am – 12 pm in the fellowship hall of the church (physical address is 355 Chicken Bridge Rd, Pittsboro).

Please plan to attend.  Share the date and location with anyone who has had Lyme Disease, cares for someone who has Lyme disease or anyone simply interested in learning more about Lyme disease.

If you are interested in being notified of the meetings, please send an email to Lynn Frost at *protected email*

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Chatham County urges early preparedness for possible Hurricane Irma impact http://chathamjournal.com/2017/09/08/chatham-county-urges-early-preparedness-possible-hurricane-irma-impact/ Fri, 08 Sep 2017 18:45:23 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7953 Pittsboro, NC – As Hurricane Irma approaches the United States, it is an important reminder that Chatham County residents and their families should take action now to prepare for emergency events like hurricanes.  Knowing your risks, getting prepared, and staying…

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Pittsboro, NC – As Hurricane Irma approaches the United States, it is an important reminder that Chatham County residents and their families should take action now to prepare for emergency events like hurricanes.  Knowing your risks, getting prepared, and staying informed are just a few steps you can take to get ready.

Make an evacuation plan and family emergency communication plan, and include your pets. Plan how you will assemble your family and loved ones, and anticipate where you will go for different situations. Get together with your family and agree on the ways to contact one another in an emergency and identify meeting locations.

emergency kitKeep an emergency kit wherever you spend time: home, car, work, etc. An emergency supplies kit is simply a group of items your family may need in or after an emergency. You most likely have the items around the house. You just need to put them together in a box.

Basic Supplies

  • Water – 1 gallon per person per day for 3 to 7 days
  • Food – non-perishable and canned food supply for 3 to 7 days
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and National oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  Weather Radio with extra batteries
  • Cell phone with charger
  • First aid kit and first aid book
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Anti-bacterial hand wipes or gel
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off water
  • Blanket or sleeping bag – 1 per person
  • Prescription medications and glasses
  • Seasonal change of clothing, including sturdy shoes
  • Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, feminine supplies
  • Extra house and car keys
  • Important documents – insurance policies, copy of driver’s license, Social Security card, bank account records
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Cash and change
  • Books, games or cards

Unique Needs

You and your family members may have special needs. You need to plan for those needs when making your emergency supply kit.

For Baby:

  • Formula
  • Bottles
  • Diapers
  • Baby wipes
  • Pacifier
  • Soap/Baby powder
  • Clothing
  • Blankets
  • Canned food and juices

For Adults:

  • Contact lenses and supplies
  • Extra eye glasses
  • Dentures

For people with Functional Needs:

  • Container for hearing aid/cochlear implant processor (to keep dry)
  • Extra batteries for hearing aid/choclear implant
  • Communication card explaining best way to communicate with you

First Aid Kit

You should have basic first aid supplies on hand to help you if you have an injured family member or friend after an emergency. It is important to know how to treat minor injuries. Taking a first aid class is helpful too. Simply having a first aid kit can help you stop bleeding, avoid infection and assist in sanitization.

  • Two pairs of latex or other germ-free gloves (if you are allergic to latex)
  • Germ-free bandages to stop bleeding
  • Cleansing agent/soap and antibiotic towels
  • Antibiotic cream
  • Burn cream
  • Adhesive bandages in a variety of sizes
  • Eye wash solution to flush the eyes
  • Thermometer
  • Prescription medications you take every day such as insulin, heart medicine and asthma inhalers. You should periodically rotate medicines to account for expiration dates.
  • Prescribed medical supplies such as glucose and blood pressure monitoring equipment and supplies
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant

Non-prescription drugs:

  • Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever
  • Anti-diarrhea medication
  • Antacid
  • Syrup of Ipecac (use to induce vomiting if advised by the Poison Control Center)
  • Laxative
  • Potassium Iodide (for those who live near nuclear plants; use only as ordered by the State Health Director)

Pets

You need to have an emergency supplies kit for your pet. Keep this kit with the family kit. Make sure every person knows where the kit is kept. The Items below should go in your pet’s kit.

  • Canned or dry pet food
  • Water for 3 to 7 days
  • Food dishes
  • Muzzle, collar and leash
  • Immunization records
  • Identification tag (should contain pet name and phone number)
  • Current photos of your pets in case they become lost
  • Medicine your pet requires
  • Pet beds and toys
  • Pet carrier
  • Proper fitting muzzle

More information on how to build an emergency kit can be found at: https://readync.org/EN/Plan_GetAKit.html.

Know where to go for trusted sources of information in an emergency.  Chatham residents can sign up for CodeRED, a local phone-based emergency notification system, here: http://bit.ly/2gMwi3D.  Information can also be found on Chatham County’s official Twitter: @ChathamCountyNC.

While it is still unclear what path Irma will take, it is important to have a plan in place and supplies ready for emergency events.  For more information on how to prepare for emergencies, including hurricanes, please visit www.readync.org.

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As tick activity increases, Chatham County Public Health Department hosts tick forum http://chathamjournal.com/2017/05/30/tick-activity-increases-chatham-county-public-health-department-hosts-tick-forum/ Tue, 30 May 2017 15:43:11 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7670 Pittsboro, NC – On Friday, April 28, the Chatham County Public Health Department, with leadership from the Board of Health, hosted the 2017 Tick Forum to discuss issues around ticks and tick-borne illness in North Carolina, with a focus on…

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Pittsboro, NC – On Friday, April 28, the Chatham County Public Health Department, with leadership from the Board of Health, hosted the 2017 Tick Forum to discuss issues around ticks and tick-borne illness in North Carolina, with a focus on Chatham County.  The event featured presentations by local, state, and national experts on these issues and was well attended by local and regional residents and stakeholders interested in learning more about mitigating tick-related issues.  Presentation topics included tick-borne illness burden in North Carolina, history of ticks, deer population management, impacts of deer management on tick-borne illness, and land use impacts on the tick population.

In Chatham County, tick-borne illnesses are a major concern, with Rocky Mountain spotted fever topping the list each year.  Other tick-borne illnesses found in Chatham include Lyme disease, Southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI), and ehrlichiosis.  Summer is fast approaching and people are spending more time outdoors, so it is important for everyone to take precautions to protect against tick bites.

What can you do to protect yourself from these dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases? The North Carolina Division of Public Health encourages the following activities to help protect against illness caused by ticks:

*   Avoid tick habitats, which includes wooded, grassy, or brushy areas.
*   If you can’t avoid a tick habitat, use tick repellent and wear light-colored clothing, long sleeves, and long pants.  Tuck your pants legs into your socks.
*   Check yourself and your kids for ticks when returning from being outdoors. Be especially watchful around the waist, the groin, and the neck.
*   If you see an attached tick, carefully remove it by grasping the tick with fine-tipped tweezers as close as possible to your skin and apply a steady gentle pressure until it releases. The Chatham County Public Health Department has tick kits available that include tweezers and important information related to ticks.
*   After safely removing the tick, document the location of attachment, the day the tick was removed, photograph or save the tick by taping it to an index card so it may be identified if you fall ill, and watch for signs of illness such as rash or fever.  If you experience these symptoms, see your health care provider and let them know you were recently bitten by a tick

While it is not possible to prevent all cases of tick-borne illness, you can greatly reduce your risk by following these basic control measures.

To learn more about ticks or to watch videos of the Tick Forum presentations, visit www.chathamnc.org/ticks.

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Three carbon monoxide alarms named ‘Don’t Buy: Safety Risk’ by Consumer Reports http://chathamjournal.com/2017/03/18/three-carbon-monoxide-alarms-named-dont-buy-safety-risk-consumer-reports/ Sat, 18 Mar 2017 17:47:05 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7419 by Paul Hope Yonkers, NY – In Consumer Reports’ most recent tests of carbon monoxide alarms, three similar-looking off-brand alarms failed critical performance tests and have been rated Don’t Buy: Safety Risk. All three were purchased from online retailers: • NetBoat…

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by Paul Hope

Yonkers, NY – In Consumer Reports’ most recent tests of carbon monoxide alarms, three similar-looking off-brand alarms failed critical performance tests and have been rated Don’t Buy: Safety Risk. All three were purchased from online retailers:

• NetBoat WB_H3110061 LCD Portable Security Gas CO Carbon Poisoning Monitor (Amazon)
• Foho YJ-806 LCD Portable Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Monitor Alarm (Amazon)
• GoChange 882 LCD Portable Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Monitor Alarm (eBay)

On average, an estimated 148 people in the United States die each year from accidental exposure to carbon monoxide produced by consumer products such as gas furnaces and ranges. Because carbon monoxide alarms are a critical line of defense against accidental poisoning, it’s imperative that they work properly.

Consumer Reports is unaware of any death or injury linked to these three models.

We test CO alarms for their sensitivity at different concentrations of carbon monoxide because even a relatively low concentration can be dangerous if the exposure is over a long enough period of time.

Two of these alarms failed to sound when exposed to carbon monoxide at a concentration of 100 parts per million: the GoChange and the NetBoat. An alarm should sound within 40 to 165 minutes at that level of exposure.

Additionally, the GoChange alarm failed to sound when exposed to carbon monoxide concentrations of 400 parts per million—a level at which an alarm should sound within 4 to 15 minutes. The NetBoat model did sound an alarm at this higher concentration, but did so after an average of only 30 seconds, instead of the recommended 4 to 15 minutes, which poses a different risk.

“Models that alarm too quickly make it more likely that a consumer would remove the batteries or disconnect the alarm to stop nuisance alarms,” says Bernie Deitrick, Consumer Reports test engineer. “That can leave people unprotected in dangerous situations.”

A third model, the Foho, sounded too quickly at both levels—averaging 15 minutes at the lower level of exposure and 1½ minutes at the higher level of exposure.

All three models have been rated Don’t Buy: Safety Risk, and Consumer Reports has notified the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) of its findings, as well as Amazon and eBay.

After we alerted eBay, the company told us that based on our report it had removed the GoChange listing and requested that the seller contact any buyers who may have purchased the alarm. The company also told us that it was unable to find any other listings for the GoChange alarm and said that consumers who believe they purchased one should request a refund directly from the seller. Alternatively, eBay has a money back guarantee.

Amazon told CR that the models we tested had been removed from its website, as had similar-looking models we pointed out that did not list that they met important safety standards. Amazon’s official policy prohibits the sale of carbon monoxide alarms that haven’t been tested to the standard, and the company indicated it would work with consumers who may have purchased these alarms under the terms of its return policy.

Consumers should be aware that while these products may no longer be available on Amazon and eBay, they may still be available on other sites.

Labels to Look For

All three of the carbon monoxide alarms that failed CR’s tests appear similar on the outside, and lack a brand logo on the alarm itself and on the packaging. None carry a logo indicating that they’ve been tested to meet UL’s carbon monoxide alarm standard (UL-2034), which specifies a range of appropriate response times at various concentrations of CO in the air.

A legitimate alarm can be certified by UL or labs other than UL to meet the UL-2034 standard. The certifying lab’s symbol will appear both on the packaging and on the alarm itself—typically on the side that mounts to the wall. UL told CR in an interview that it’s rare for a carbon monoxide alarm to possess a counterfeit UL symbol.

“If your alarm does not carry certification that it has passed the UL standard’s requirements, we recommend that you replace it either with one that does or with one that has passed our tests,” say Deitrick. “All the tested models in Consumer Reports’ ratings that are assigned an overall score will reliably alert you to dangerous levels of CO, without triggering nuisance alarms at lower levels.” What distinguishes recommended models, explains Deitrick, is that they alert you earlier within the appropriate time window.

CR’s top-rated standalone CO alarm is the First Alert CO615. First Alert also makes CR’s top-rated interconnected CO and smoke alarm, the OneLink SCO501CN, which syncs with all the other compatible alarms in your home. Interconnected alarms provide an extra level of protection: If CO is detected in the basement, the alarm in your second-floor bedroom will also sound, giving you a more immediate warning.

In addition to owning functioning carbon monoxide alarms, it’s important that you place them correctly. Consumer Reports advises placing alarms on every level of your home, including your basement, and near (not inside) attached garages. More information on proper placement and tested models is available in our CO alarm buying guide.

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Consumer Reports: Widespread misuse of common OTC sleep drugs may pose serious health risks http://chathamjournal.com/2017/01/16/consumer-reports-widespread-misuse-common-otc-sleep-drugs-may-pose-serious-health-risks/ Tue, 17 Jan 2017 00:19:56 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7171 YONKERS, NY — Too many people with insomnia routinely rely on over-the-counter sleep medications on a daily basis, finds Consumer Reports. Given how many people develop a habit of taking these drugs, CR takes a closer look at the claim…

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YONKERS, NY — Too many people with insomnia routinely rely on over-the-counter sleep medications on a daily basis, finds Consumer Reports. Given how many people develop a habit of taking these drugs, CR takes a closer look at the claim “non–habit forming,” found on packaging for these widely available medications, and notes that dependency can be psychological in nature and not necessarily physical.

OTC Sleeping PillsIn a nationally representative survey by Consumer Reports, nearly one in five (18%) respondents who said they took an OTC sleep aid within the past year, took it on a daily basis. An extraordinary forty-one percent of people who have taken OTC sleep aids in the past year said they used these medications for a year or longer.

“More people turn to over-the-counter sleep drugs than prescription meds for help with their insomnia. But given these survey findings, we can see consumers are taking them for far too long, which can be risky,” says Lisa Gill, deputy content editor of Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs, a public education project that reviews more than 650 medications for common health conditions.

Facts about the risks

One of the more serious concerns associated with the long-term use of first generation antihistamines, including diphenhydramine, is an increased risk of the possibility of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. “Our new report shows that for people with chronic insomnia, working with a cognitive behavioral therapist is a much better and safer first step than medication,” says Gill.

Diphenhydramine, found in many night-time sleep aids, may cause complications such as constipation, confusion, dizziness and next-day drowsiness and put consumers at increased risk for impaired balance, coordination and driving performance the day after the drug is used. Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs suggests if you must take an OTC insomnia medication, do so for only a few days at a time at the lowest recommended dose. And never take extra pills or mix the medication with other sleep drugs. If your insomnia doesn’t go away after two weeks, it’s time to see a doctor.

For consumers struggling with chronic insomnia, CR Best Buy Drugs recommends cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) instead of sleeping pills as a first choice treatment. And for those who opt for a sleep aid, CR recommends several steps consumers can take to be safe. The report is part of a broader sleep package with advice on shopping for mattresses and pillows, featured in the February 2017 issue of Consumer Reports and online at CR.org.

Consumers with sleep troubles – which can be easily aggravated during the holidays – might think the easy solution is to reach for one of those sleep drugs available over-the-counter such as Advil PM, Nytol, Simply Sleep, Sominex, Tylenol PM, Unisom SleepMinis, or perhaps the popular ZzzQuil, from the makers of Nyquil.

Of concern is the drug diphenhydramine, a remedy long used to treat seasonal allergies that can create a psychological dependency, even though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows manufacturers to claim lawfully that OTC drugs are non-habit forming. The claim “non-habit forming” has been allowed since before the 1962 passage of legislation requiring drugs to be evaluated for safety, quality, and effectiveness before being marketed. At the time of their approval as OTC sleep aids, there wasn’t enough evidence to show the drugs caused dependence, so the term remains even now on packages of OTC sleep meds.

Based on a review of medical evidence, for those whose chronic insomnia is not so easily fixed, Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs recommends the following:

  • Try cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) instead of sleeping pills as a first choice treatment. Through CBT, you work with a licensed sleep therapist, learning about habits and attitudes that may compromise your sleep. Studies suggest that CBT helps 70 to 80 percent of people with chronic insomnia, and effects are long-lasting, with few – if any –downsides.
  • For those who still decide to take insomnia drugs, do so for only a few days at a time, at the lowest possible dose.
  • Never drink alcohol while taking insomnia drugs, and don’t take an extra pill to get back to sleep. Doing either of these things can worsen the drug’s side effects.
  • Pay close attention to sleeping pill labels and avoid mixing them with other sleep drugs or supplements, including OTC nighttime pain relievers and antihistamines.
  • Always use caution when driving the day after you take an insomnia drug as you might still be drowsy.

Dangerous combination: alcohol with sleep aids and other medications

Consumer Reports’ recommendation never to drink alcohol while taking OTC sleep aids is confirmed by another report warning consumers about the dangers of mixing medications with alcohol, which offers timely and potentially life-saving advice for holiday partygoers. More than 100 medications – including prescription and OTC medications – can interact with alcohol, bringing on problems ranging from headaches and nausea to difficult breathing and internal bleeding and worse.

The free report explains which types of medications place consumers at increased risk of medical conditions such as dizziness, drowsiness or more serious conditions, like seizures and liver damage. For people age 65 and older who may take multiple medications, the risk of harmful drug-alcohol interactions becomes even more serious. CR explains that aging slows the body’s ability to break down alcohol, so it remains in the system longer. “Even one drink can pose hazards if it’s combined with the wrong medication. In some situations, you may need to abstain from alcohol a day before or after taking certain drugs,” says Gill.

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Flu shot information Chatham County residents can use http://chathamjournal.com/2016/10/28/flu-shot-information-chatham-county-residents-can-use/ Fri, 28 Oct 2016 21:07:49 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=6923 Pittsboro, NC – With flu season fast-approaching, it is important to get vaccinated. Last season, over 200 North Carolinians died from the flu. The best way to protect yourself, your family, your classmates and your co-workers against the flu is to…

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Pittsboro, NC – With flu season fast-approaching, it is important to get vaccinated. Last season, over 200 North Carolinians died from the flu. The best way to protect yourself, your family, your classmates and your co-workers against the flu is to get the annual flu vaccination. With many local options available, including pharmacies and drug stores, getting vaccinated is more convenient than ever.

fIt is recommended that everyone over the age of six months get a flu vaccine. For people who are high risk, the flu can be especially dangerous. This includes people over 65 years old and those with chronic medical conditions. If you are a caregiver or family member of someone who is high risk, it is also very important that you are vaccinated. If you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to the vaccine, have had Guillain-Barr Syndrome, or are not feeling well, please let your doctor or the person who gives the vaccine know beforehand to determine what is best for you.

Also, remember that personal hygiene habits, such as frequent hand washing with soap, use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers, covering coughs and sneezes with tissue or sleeve, and staying home when ill, help to prevent the spread of the flu.

In response to the changing needs of our community, the Chatham County Public Health Department is focusing its flu vaccination outreach efforts this year on Chatham County residents who are unable to leave their homes to get the flu vaccine.  If you or someone you know is homebound due to medical or physical disabilities and would like to receive the influenza vaccine, please contact Bonnie Dukeman at the Chatham County Public Health Department at 919-742-5641.

In addition to outreach efforts to the homebound, the Chatham County Public Health Department will give flu vaccine at its Siler City clinic location. Please call 919-742-5641 to schedule your appointment.

Most insurance is accepted, and the cost without insurance is $30 for the shot. The CDC does not recommend Flumist this year.

For additional information, please visit www.chathamnc.org/flu.

Flu shot information Chatham County residents can use appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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Register for the 6th annual Chatham County Alzheimer’s Walk and 5K Run http://chathamjournal.com/2016/08/07/register-chatham-alzheimers-walk-5k-run/ Sun, 07 Aug 2016 11:13:32 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=6778 Pittsboro, NC – The 6th Annual Chatham County Alzheimer’s Walk and 5K Run will be held Saturday, September 10, at Galloway Ridge at Fearrington in Pittsboro. This year’s event has something for the whole family, including a new Fun Run…

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Pittsboro, NC – The 6th Annual Chatham County Alzheimer’s Walk and 5K Run will be held Saturday, September 10, at Galloway Ridge at Fearrington in Pittsboro. This year’s event has something for the whole family, including a new Fun Run for children ages 4-11. Among other activities are a resource fair, music, and food vendors. Pre-registration is now open. Onsite registration begins at 7:00 a.m. on event day, with the Fun Run starting at 8:00 a.m. and the 5K Run and Walk at 8:30 a.m.

Alzheimers RunThere are various ways to get involved with the event this year including sponsorships, in kind donations, creating walk teams accompanied by pledges or registering to run by visiting www.gallowayridge.com.

Alzheimer’s is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. Walks held around the state offer a chance for caregivers and individuals with Alzheimer’s and dementia to connect with resources in their community and find support from one another. They also raise much-needed funding.

“Funds raised from events like these allow us to continue our programs and services to families in North Carolina while focusing attention on the needs of the more than 175,000 North Carolinians diagnosed with Alzheimer’s,” says Lisa Levine, Program Director at Alzheimer’s NC.  An estimated 5.4 million Americans have the disease at an annual cost of more than $200 billion in lost wages, insurance, productivity, and other areas.

Alzheimer’s North Carolina provides education, programs and services, advocacy, emergency respite, and research funding for cause, prevention, treatment, and cure.  For information and assistance if you are dealing with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia, call Alzheimers North Carolina at (919) 832-3732 or visit the website at www.alznc.org.

For more information please contact Pat Richardson at (919) 642-6893.

Register for the 6th annual Chatham County Alzheimer’s Walk and 5K Run appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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Chatham County offers free tobacco cessation classes this summer http://chathamjournal.com/2016/06/19/free-tobacco-cessation-classes-summer/ Sun, 19 Jun 2016 04:25:21 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=6460 Siler City, NC – Tobacco cessation classes will begin on June 27th and will be available to any Chatham County resident or Chatham County employee looking to quit using tobacco. Don’t miss this opportunity to receive personal instruction from experienced…

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Siler City, NC – Tobacco cessation classes will begin on June 27th and will be available to any Chatham County resident or Chatham County employee looking to quit using tobacco. Don’t miss this opportunity to receive personal instruction from experienced staff from the Chatham County Public Health Department.

StopSmokingQuitSmart is a proven effective program to help quit all types of tobacco, including smoking, dip/chew and electronic cigarettes. Participants will receive a free QuitSmart Stop Smoking Kit and all sessions are provided free of charge. These sessions will be held from 5:30 pm-6:45 pm on June 27, July 11, and July 13. All sessions will be held at Chatham Hospital in Siler City, located at 163 Chatham Medical Park Drive, Suite 140 in the Chatham Medical Park Office Building.

Are you ready to make a firm decision to quit smoking and quit tobacco use? Contact Jennifer Park at *protected email* (919-545-8444) or Anna Stormzand at *protected email* (919-545-8445) to reserve your spot or for more information.

Chatham County offers free tobacco cessation classes this summer appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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