Living – Chatham Journal Newspaper http://chathamjournal.com Experience the World of Chatham County, NC Fri, 16 Feb 2018 05:03:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://i1.wp.com/chathamjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/10888465-four-newspaper-pile-isolated-on-white-background-Stock-Vector-newspaper-icon-headline-5580d7a0v1_site_icon.png?fit=32%2C32 Living – Chatham Journal Newspaper http://chathamjournal.com 32 32 Experience the World of Chatham County, NC Living – Chatham Journal Newspaper Experience the World of Chatham County, NC Living – Chatham Journal Newspaper http://chathamjournal.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://chathamjournal.com/category/living/ TV-G 63016882 Secretary Regan will present CCCC sustainability lecture http://chathamjournal.com/2018/02/15/secretary-regan-will-present-cccc-sustainability-lecture/ Fri, 16 Feb 2018 04:48:06 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=8440 Pittsboro, NC – Michael S. Regan, Secretary of the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality, will be the speaker for the college’s second sustainable speaker series in honor of Richard and Rebecca Hayes. The program, which will be held at 10…

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Pittsboro, NC – Michael S. Regan, Secretary of the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality, will be the speaker for the college’s second sustainable speaker series in honor of Richard and Rebecca Hayes.

The program, which will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, March 8, in the Holmes Meeting Room of the Chatham Community Library on the Central Carolina Community College Chatham Main Campus in Pittsboro, is sponsored by the Richard and Rebecca Hayes Endowed Lecture Fund for Environmental Policy and Stewardship through the CCCC Foundation.

As DEQ secretary, Regan oversees the state agency whose mission is to protect North Carolina’s environment and natural resources. The organization has offices from the mountains to the coast and administers regulatory and public assistance programs aimed at protecting the quality of North Carolina’s air, water and land, its coastal fisheries, and the public’s health.

Regan joined the Gov. Roy Cooper administration after more than 18 years of professional experience focused on overcoming complex challenges through environmental advocacy and regulation. Most recently, he served as the Associate Vice President of U.S. Climate and Energy and Southeast Regional Director of the Environmental Defense Fund. He led the Environmental Defense Fund’s efforts to reduce the impacts of climate change and air quality pollution.

Prior to that, Regan worked with the Environmental Protection Agency’s air quality and energy programs for the Clinton and Bush administrations. Before leaving the agency, Regan served as a national program manager responsible for designing programs aimed at reducing pollution, and market-based solutions to improve energy efficiency, air quality and climate-related challenges.

Regan also founded M. Regan & Associates, LLC, a firm dedicated to helping organizations find transformational solutions to complex energy, environmental and economic challenges.

A native of Goldsboro, Regan has a bachelor’s degree in Earth and Environmental Science from N.C. Agricultural and Technical State University and a master’s degree in Public Administration from George Washington University.

Richard Hayes has said of the endowment: “We hope that through this endowment, an annual public lecture will be possible at CCCC, to both students and citizens of our community, to provide them with the very best and the very latest science information relating to what is happening to our planet because of global warming; and more importantly, what measures can be and should be taken, by each of us and all of us, to protect and preserve our precious water, soil, and air and the lives both human and animal they support.”

CCCC President Dr. T. Eston Marchant says the college is thankful for friends like Richard and Rebecca Hayes. “We are grateful to Mr. and Mrs. Hayes for their contributions to the college and to the community,” he said.

The CCCC Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization affiliated with, but independent of, Central Carolina Community College. It receives donations of money and equipment on behalf of the college and uses them to promote its educational mission and assist students through scholarships and grants.

For more information about the Foundation, its work and events, visit www.cccc.edu/foundation/. For more information about classes and programs at Central Carolina Community College, visit www.cccc.edu.

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Register now for the Chatham County CERT course coming in February http://chathamjournal.com/2018/01/08/register-now-chatham-county-cert-course/ Mon, 08 Jan 2018 16:47:11 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=8291 Pittsboro, NC – Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) is a national program that educates volunteers about disaster preparedness for the hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search…

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Pittsboro, NC – Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) is a national program that educates volunteers about disaster preparedness for the hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. CERT offers a consistent, nationwide approach to volunteer training and organization that professional responders can rely on during disaster situations, which allows them to focus on more complex tasks. Through CERT, the capabilities to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters is built and enhanced.

FEMA’s Community Emergency Response Team Program trains volunteers to prepare for the types of disasters that their community may face. Through hands-on practice and realistic exercises, CERT members:

    • Learn how to safely respond to manmade and natural hazards
    • Help organize basic disaster response
    • Promote preparedness by hosting and participating in community events

To everyone who has expressed or may have interest in Chatham County CERT training – the first CERT class has been scheduled. There is no cost for the class.

The CERT class is 2 1/2 days long. Dates are:
Wed, Feb 28 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thu, Mar 01 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Fri, Mar 02, 9:00 AM – 12:00 noon

Location:
Chatham Co Agriculture & Conference Center
1192 US 64 W Business, Pittsboro, NC 27312
Please register at this link.

FMI: Email Terry Schmidt at *protected email*or call 919-642-3721

 

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Courts order tobacco companies to run ads about their products http://chathamjournal.com/2018/01/03/courts-order-tobacco-companies-run-ads-products/ Wed, 03 Jan 2018 22:34:38 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=8249 by Shannon Kincaide Godbout Pittsboro, NC – Starting November 26, 2017, the major U.S. tobacco companies began running ads in newspapers in NC and nationally telling the American people the known facts about the deadly consequences of smoking and secondhand…

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by Shannon Kincaide Godbout

Pittsboro, NC – Starting November 26, 2017, the major U.S. tobacco companies began running ads in newspapers in NC and nationally telling the American people the known facts about the deadly consequences of smoking and secondhand smoke.

Official U.S. documents show that a federal court in 2006 ordered the companies to make these statements after finding the companies guilty of breaking civil racketeering laws and making misrepresentations to the public about the dangers of smoking and how some ads are marketed to children. The ads will run after 11 years of appeals by the tobacco companies, who successfully fought to remove the phrase “here is the truth” from the corrective statements, which would have implied that the industry deliberately deceived the public.

Many public health advocates in NC welcome the corrective statement ads, citing that they will focus attention on the enormous public health problem caused by tobacco use and the need for strong action to save lives. To reduce tobacco use, advocates are ready to partner with state-wide officials to address four evidence-based measures to reduce tobacco use, especially by teens:  1) raise the age of sale of tobacco products to 21; 2) adopt strengthened smoke-free laws and policies; 3) increase the price of cigarettes by at least $1.50 per pack; and 4) strengthen the funding for state and local tobacco prevention and cessation programming.

“We have seen the positive impact that our county’s tobacco-free policy has had on our staff and the public,” said Chatham County Health Director Layton Long. “Tobacco-free policies play a large part in helping people quit, and for those who have successfully quit, quitting for good. These policies set a positive example for our youth and also help reduce exposure to secondhand smoke when visitors come to our offices. We hope that these ads will serve as a reminder that tobacco and its byproducts are hazardous to our health and that we need to continue to support prevention and cessation programs.”

According to the NC Youth Tobacco Survey (2015), in NC alone, 9.3 percent of high school students still smoke and nearly 16.8% use electronic cigarettes (http://bit.ly/2CkKZ4m).  According to the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids, tobacco use claims 14,200 NC lives and costs the state $3.81 billion in health care bills annually (http://bit.ly/2B1ieZW).

“For too many years, the public health community has known and seen the dangerous effects that tobacco has on our youth,” said Long. “We hope that these statements from the tobacco companies will send a clear message to our youth that all tobacco products, including new products like electronic cigarettes, are dangerous, addictive, and ultimately lead to disease and early death.”

In 1999, the U.S. Department of Justice sued the major cigarette manufacturers, charging they had violated the civil provisions of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) and other laws. Tobacco company defendants in the case include Altria, its Philip Morris USA subsidiary, and R.J. Reynolds.

On Aug. 17, 2006, U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler issued her verdict against the companies.

Judge Kessler ordered the tobacco companies to publish corrective statements on five topics, stating they had deliberately deceived the public:

  • the adverse health effects of smoking;
  • addictiveness of smoking and nicotine;
  • lack of significant health benefit from smoking “low tar,” “light,” “ultra light,” “mild,” and “natural” cigarettes (products that have been deceptively marketed as less harmful than regular cigarettes);
  • manipulation of cigarette design and composition to ensure optimum nicotine delivery; and
  • adverse health effects of exposure to secondhand smoke.

The corrective statement ads started running November 26, 2017, in print and online in about 50 newspapers specified by the court. They will also run during prime time on the major television networks for one year. The tobacco companies must also publish the corrective statements on their websites and cigarette packs; according to national networks, implementation details are still being finalized.

The corrective statement newspaper ads must run in the front section of Sunday newspapers on November 26, 2017; December 10, 2017; January 7, 2018; February 4, 2018; and March 4, 2018. In NC, corrective statements will appear in the Charlotte Observer. Per the judge’s order, corrective statements will also appear in USA Today and the Wall Street Journal. The tobacco companies will pay the entire cost of running the ads.

Despite significant progress in reducing smoking, tobacco use is still the leading preventable cause of death and disease in the United States, killing more than 480,000 Americans and costing the nation about $170 billion in health care expenses each year.

Support is available for those interested in quitting tobacco. The Chatham County Public Health Department is offering free tobacco cessation classes this January for any Chatham County resident, employee, and their family members. Participants will receive a free QuitSmart Stop Smoking Kit and two weeks of nicotine replacement therapy. These free sessions will be held from 5:30 pm-6:45 pm on January 17th, January 29th, and January 31st. There will also be an informational session held on January 10th to learn more about the QuitSmart program. All sessions will be held at the Chatham County Public Health Department in Pittsboro (80 East Street). Contact Anna Stormzand at *protected email* (919-545-8445) to reserve your spot or for more information.

QuitlineNC is also a free cessation resource and is available 24 hours a day to assist individuals quitting tobacco. Call toll-free 1 800-QUIT-NOW or visit www.quitlinenc.org.

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Special thanks to Donna and her team at Bella Donna’s restaurant for amazing experience http://chathamjournal.com/2018/01/02/special-thanks-donna-team-bella-donnas-restaurant-amazing-experience/ Tue, 02 Jan 2018 17:11:41 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=8242 by*protected email* Pittsboro, NC – I was coming up on my 15th wedding anniversary. Because it’s one of those milestone years I thought it should be more special than simply bringing home some flowers after my day at work. While…

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by*protected email*

Pittsboro, NC – I was coming up on my 15th wedding anniversary. Because it’s one of those milestone years I thought it should be more special than simply bringing home some flowers after my day at work. While I was vetting some ideas I thought about the things my wife would like, and one of the things that she absolutely loves is great Italian food. But we eat Italian all the time, I wanted it to be a bit of an event to cap off a bunch of other stuff I was planning for the day. I then had an idea and I called Donna at Bella Donna’s to see if we could pull it off. I honestly thought she was going to tell me to go take a long walk off a short pier. My idea was simple, a table in the kitchen like I had seen at really high-end places in Miami and New York but but one that neither myself nor my wife had ever experienced.

Donna knew exactly what I was talking about, she called it a chef’s table. Without batting an eye she said she’d do it.  After confirming the day and time I left the rest of it up to her as I had a ton of other things I had planned that I needed to work through.

Donna did not disappoint! When we walked in in the corner of her kitchen was one of the dining room tables perfectly set up for a meal for two. Perched above the table on a shelf that probably holds dishes or some other kitchen supplies, she had set up a little speaker playing Italian music. The table was set up theater style with both of us facing the same direction looking out at the stove and pasta preparation areas.

The food was great as it always is at Bella Donna’s. What I had never known before was how much work and care goes into every meal. Every single strand of pasta for every plate is hand-spun fresh. I know, we were sitting right by the machine and it got used often.  There were constant checks by Donna over the quality of the food as it was being cooked.  In addition to our meal she brought samples of the different things that were on the menu for the evening. Some like the calamari that reminded me of my dad were  emotionally impactful beyond their great taste!

I don’t know if this is going to become a regular offering at Bella Donna’s, but I can say that the experience was one we will treasure for the rest of our lives.

If there is any regret to the evening, it’s that because it was the first time, Donna was on her best behavior. That means I got a lot less shouting in the kitchen than I thought I would. Who knows, maybe Donna will feel comfortable enough with customers in the kitchen that by my 20th that she’ll really let loose when the pasta primavera isn’t prepared just right! 🙂

Bella Donna Italian Restaurant

Address: 440 East St, Pittsboro, NC 27312

Phone: +1-919-545-0900

Hours: 11:00am-2:00pm, 4:00pm-10:00pm

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Lyme disease support group holding organizational meeting on January 20 http://chathamjournal.com/2018/01/01/lyme-disease-support-group-holding-organizational-meeting-january-20/ Tue, 02 Jan 2018 04:52:51 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=8205 Pittsboro, NC – Lyme disease, the potentially debilitating tick-borne illness, is on the rise in North Carolina. The state Department of Health and Human Services reported 30 confirmed and 236 probable cases of Lyme disease last year. In 2011 there were…

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Pittsboro, NC – Lyme disease, the potentially debilitating tick-borne illness, is on the rise in North Carolina.

The state Department of Health and Human Services reported 30 confirmed and 236 probable cases of Lyme disease last year. In 2011 there were fewer than 100 cases in the state.

Lyme disease is caused by bacteria spread by infected deer ticks, also known as black-legged ticks. Deer ticks are small, dark-colored and typically inhabit areas with tall grass, bushes, deep woods and/or fallen leaves. Not all deer ticks carry the Lyme disease bacteria.

Brown’s Chapel United Methodist Church has been approached by a Lyme activist in the local community to help organize a Lyme Disease Support Group in Chatham County starting in 2018.  There will be an organizational meeting on Saturday, January 20 from 10:30 am – 12 pm in the fellowship hall of the church (physical address is 355 Chicken Bridge Rd, Pittsboro).

Please plan to attend.  Share the date and location with anyone who has had Lyme Disease, cares for someone who has Lyme disease or anyone simply interested in learning more about Lyme disease.

If you are interested in being notified of the meetings, please send an email to Lynn Frost at *protected email*

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Chatham Habitat for Humanity to hold 4th annual “Cars for Castles Cruise-In” on October 7 http://chathamjournal.com/2017/09/11/chatham-habitat-humanity-will-4th-annual-cars-castles-cruise-october-7/ Mon, 11 Sep 2017 15:02:23 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7974 by *protected email* Pittsboro, NC – Chatham Habitat for Humanity will hold it’s 4th annual “Cars for Castles Cruise-In” on Saturday, October 7 from 10 am to 3 pm at the Chatham County Fairgrounds in Pittsboro. There will be a…

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by *protected email*

Pittsboro, NC – Chatham Habitat for Humanity will hold it’s 4th annual “Cars for Castles Cruise-In” on Saturday, October 7 from 10 am to 3 pm at the Chatham County Fairgrounds in Pittsboro.

There will be a Pig Pickin’ with BBQ plates, cooked by Ronald Taylor. The pig is being donated by Purvis Farms. (Plates are $8 for spectators and $6if you enter your car.) The plate consist of BBQ, slaw, baked beans, chips, dessert and drink.

There will be raffles, door prizes and more. DJ Dan Augustine will provide music and entertainment throughout the event.

All cars, truck and motorcycles are welcome. Entrance fee for cars is $20 and spectators enter free. Judges will be awarding trophies to different categories.

The event is hosted by Norman Clark and The Chatham County Stallions.

This year the event has over 40 wonderful and generous sponsors. Be sure to visit their tent and tables at the car show.

TITLE SPONSOR:

  • Pittsboro Ford

GOLD SPONSORS:

  • Arauco – North America
  • Sonny Keisler
  • Mountaire Farms
  • Platinum Commons
  • PSNC

SILVER SPONSORS:

  • 501 Pharmacy
  • 64 West Service Center, Inc.
  • Bruce’s Carpet and Flooring
  • CB Powersports
  • Chatham Auto Spa
  • Edward Jones-Lee Shanklin, Reg. 28
  • Engineered Plastic Components, Inc.
  • Green Panda Farms
  • Jill Wenstrand – State Farm
  • Keith Baxter Service Center
  • Knotts Funeral Homes
  • Ladies of Legacy
  • Larry Hazelwood
  • Liberty HomeCare & Hospice Services
  • Maria Wright – Chateaux Realty, Inc.
  • Merf Mobile Auto
  • Miller Heating and Air Conditioning
  • OVM Financial
  • Performance Automotive & Tire
  • Pickle Jar Cafe & Catering
  • Pittsboro Body Shop
  • Pittsboro Family Dentistry
  • Pittsboro Outdoor Power Equipment
  • Pivot Physical Therapy
  • S & H Oil Co.
  • Sammy King, Advantage Insurance Agency
  • Sanders Automotive
  • Sister 2 Sister/One Transportation
  • Smart Cars by Wieland
  • TaJ Talk
  • The MOD
  • The Sign and Print Shop of Pittsboro
  • Thompson & Little Transportation
  • Ultra Power Sports
  • Chatham County Sheriff’s Office
  • Pittsboro Police Department

All proceeds benefit Chatham Habitat for Humanity’s mission to build safe, affordable homes for Chatham County families.

FMI: Contact Becky Loflin at 919-542-0794 x 207 or *protected email*

 

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Chatham County urges early preparedness for possible Hurricane Irma impact http://chathamjournal.com/2017/09/08/chatham-county-urges-early-preparedness-possible-hurricane-irma-impact/ Fri, 08 Sep 2017 18:45:23 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7953 Pittsboro, NC – As Hurricane Irma approaches the United States, it is an important reminder that Chatham County residents and their families should take action now to prepare for emergency events like hurricanes.  Knowing your risks, getting prepared, and staying…

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Pittsboro, NC – As Hurricane Irma approaches the United States, it is an important reminder that Chatham County residents and their families should take action now to prepare for emergency events like hurricanes.  Knowing your risks, getting prepared, and staying informed are just a few steps you can take to get ready.

Make an evacuation plan and family emergency communication plan, and include your pets. Plan how you will assemble your family and loved ones, and anticipate where you will go for different situations. Get together with your family and agree on the ways to contact one another in an emergency and identify meeting locations.

emergency kitKeep an emergency kit wherever you spend time: home, car, work, etc. An emergency supplies kit is simply a group of items your family may need in or after an emergency. You most likely have the items around the house. You just need to put them together in a box.

Basic Supplies

  • Water – 1 gallon per person per day for 3 to 7 days
  • Food – non-perishable and canned food supply for 3 to 7 days
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and National oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  Weather Radio with extra batteries
  • Cell phone with charger
  • First aid kit and first aid book
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Anti-bacterial hand wipes or gel
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off water
  • Blanket or sleeping bag – 1 per person
  • Prescription medications and glasses
  • Seasonal change of clothing, including sturdy shoes
  • Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, feminine supplies
  • Extra house and car keys
  • Important documents – insurance policies, copy of driver’s license, Social Security card, bank account records
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Cash and change
  • Books, games or cards

Unique Needs

You and your family members may have special needs. You need to plan for those needs when making your emergency supply kit.

For Baby:

  • Formula
  • Bottles
  • Diapers
  • Baby wipes
  • Pacifier
  • Soap/Baby powder
  • Clothing
  • Blankets
  • Canned food and juices

For Adults:

  • Contact lenses and supplies
  • Extra eye glasses
  • Dentures

For people with Functional Needs:

  • Container for hearing aid/cochlear implant processor (to keep dry)
  • Extra batteries for hearing aid/choclear implant
  • Communication card explaining best way to communicate with you

First Aid Kit

You should have basic first aid supplies on hand to help you if you have an injured family member or friend after an emergency. It is important to know how to treat minor injuries. Taking a first aid class is helpful too. Simply having a first aid kit can help you stop bleeding, avoid infection and assist in sanitization.

  • Two pairs of latex or other germ-free gloves (if you are allergic to latex)
  • Germ-free bandages to stop bleeding
  • Cleansing agent/soap and antibiotic towels
  • Antibiotic cream
  • Burn cream
  • Adhesive bandages in a variety of sizes
  • Eye wash solution to flush the eyes
  • Thermometer
  • Prescription medications you take every day such as insulin, heart medicine and asthma inhalers. You should periodically rotate medicines to account for expiration dates.
  • Prescribed medical supplies such as glucose and blood pressure monitoring equipment and supplies
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant

Non-prescription drugs:

  • Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever
  • Anti-diarrhea medication
  • Antacid
  • Syrup of Ipecac (use to induce vomiting if advised by the Poison Control Center)
  • Laxative
  • Potassium Iodide (for those who live near nuclear plants; use only as ordered by the State Health Director)

Pets

You need to have an emergency supplies kit for your pet. Keep this kit with the family kit. Make sure every person knows where the kit is kept. The Items below should go in your pet’s kit.

  • Canned or dry pet food
  • Water for 3 to 7 days
  • Food dishes
  • Muzzle, collar and leash
  • Immunization records
  • Identification tag (should contain pet name and phone number)
  • Current photos of your pets in case they become lost
  • Medicine your pet requires
  • Pet beds and toys
  • Pet carrier
  • Proper fitting muzzle

More information on how to build an emergency kit can be found at: https://readync.org/EN/Plan_GetAKit.html.

Know where to go for trusted sources of information in an emergency.  Chatham residents can sign up for CodeRED, a local phone-based emergency notification system, here: http://bit.ly/2gMwi3D.  Information can also be found on Chatham County’s official Twitter: @ChathamCountyNC.

While it is still unclear what path Irma will take, it is important to have a plan in place and supplies ready for emergency events.  For more information on how to prepare for emergencies, including hurricanes, please visit www.readync.org.

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USDA encourages the use of food thermometers to be food safe this summer http://chathamjournal.com/2017/07/04/usda-encourages-use-food-thermometers-food-safe-summer/ Tue, 04 Jul 2017 16:01:34 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7743 Washington, DC – Summer is a time for family vacations, backyard barbeques and plenty of outdoor activities with food as the centerpiece. But before those steaks and burgers go on the grill, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and…

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Washington, DC – Summer is a time for family vacations, backyard barbeques and plenty of outdoor activities with food as the centerpiece. But before those steaks and burgers go on the grill, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) wants to remind consumers to keep their family and themselves safe from foodborne illness by using a food thermometer to ensure meat and poultry is cooked to the correct internal temperature.

food thermometer“The best and only way to make sure bacteria have been killed and food is safe to eat is by cooking it to the correct internal temperature as measured by a food thermometer,” said FSIS Administrator Al Almanza. “It is a simple step that can stop your family and guests from getting foodborne illness.”

Recent research by USDA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found that only 34 percent of the public use a food thermometer when cooking hamburgers. If you don’t verify your burger’s internal temperature, pathogens may still be present. When eaten, those hamburgers can make your guests and your family sick.

In fact, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 48 million people suffer from foodborne illness each year, resulting in roughly 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths.

grilling foodSo how do you avoid becoming a part of those statistics? Follow USDA’s four easy steps to food safety this summer.

Clean: Make sure to always wash your hands and surfaces with soap and warm water for 20 seconds before cooking and after handling raw meat or poultry. If cooking outside or away from a kitchen, pack clean cloths and moist towelettes for cleaning surfaces and hands.

Separate: When taking food off of the grill, use clean utensils and platters. Don’t put cooked food on the same platter that held raw meat or poultry.

Cook: Always use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of meat and poultry. Place the food thermometer in the thickest part of the food.

  • Hamburgers, sausages and other ground meats should reach 160°F.
  • All poultry should reach a minimum temperature of 165°F.
  • Whole cuts of pork, lamb, veal, and of beef should be cooked to 145°F as measured by a food thermometer placed in the thickest part of the meat, and allowed to rest for three minutes before eating. A “rest time” is the amount of time the product remains at the final temperature, after it has been removed from a grill, oven, or other heat source. During the three minutes after meat is removed from the heat source, its temperature remains constant or continues to rise, which destroys pathogens.
  • Fish should be cooked to 145°F.
  • Meat and poultry cooked on a grill often browns very fast on the outside, and by using a food thermometer you can be sure items have reached a safe minimum internal temperature needed to destroy any harmful bacteria that may be present.

Chill: Place leftovers in shallow containers and refrigerate or freeze immediately. Discard food that has been sitting out longer than two hours.

Need more food safety information? Call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at (1-888-674-6854) Monday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET, or email or chat at AskKaren.gov.

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Free summer computer classes slated at Chatham Community Library http://chathamjournal.com/2017/07/03/free-summer-computer-classes-slated-chatham-community-library/ Tue, 04 Jul 2017 00:56:34 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7713 Pittsboro, NC – Chatham Community Library is offering a series of free computer classes in July and August. The names, dates and times of the classes are listed below. You can find a full description of the classes, including topics covered…

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Pittsboro, NC – Chatham Community Library is offering a series of free computer classes in July and August. The names, dates and times of the classes are listed below. You can find a full description of the classes, including topics covered and prerequisites for attending, by visiting chathamnc.org/computerclasses.

  • free computer classes at Chatham LibraryDrop-in Computer Assistance:  July 12Wednesday4:00 – 5:00 PM
  • Microsoft Word Basics, Part 1:  July 18Tuesday3:00 – 4:30 PM
  • Microsoft Word Basics, Part 2:  July 25Tuesday3:00 – 4:30 PM
  • Drop-in Computer Assistance:  August 9Wednesday4:00 – 5:00 PM
  • Microsoft PowerPoint Basics, Part 1:  August 17Thursday10:00 – 11:30 AM
  • Microsoft PowerPoint Basics, Part 2:  August 31Thursday10:00 – 11:30 AM

The Drop-In Computer Assistance sessions (July 12 and August 9) do not require registration.  For all other classes, space is limited and you must register in advance if you wish to attend.  Register online at the link above.  For more information, call 919-545-8086 or email *protected email*.

All classes take place in the computer lab at Chatham Community Library, 197 NC Hwy 87 N in Pittsboro, on the campus of Central Carolina Community College.

 

Free summer computer classes slated at Chatham Community Library appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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As tick activity increases, Chatham County Public Health Department hosts tick forum http://chathamjournal.com/2017/05/30/tick-activity-increases-chatham-county-public-health-department-hosts-tick-forum/ Tue, 30 May 2017 15:43:11 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7670 Pittsboro, NC – On Friday, April 28, the Chatham County Public Health Department, with leadership from the Board of Health, hosted the 2017 Tick Forum to discuss issues around ticks and tick-borne illness in North Carolina, with a focus on…

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As tick activity increases, Chatham County Public Health Department hosts tick forum appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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Pittsboro, NC – On Friday, April 28, the Chatham County Public Health Department, with leadership from the Board of Health, hosted the 2017 Tick Forum to discuss issues around ticks and tick-borne illness in North Carolina, with a focus on Chatham County.  The event featured presentations by local, state, and national experts on these issues and was well attended by local and regional residents and stakeholders interested in learning more about mitigating tick-related issues.  Presentation topics included tick-borne illness burden in North Carolina, history of ticks, deer population management, impacts of deer management on tick-borne illness, and land use impacts on the tick population.

In Chatham County, tick-borne illnesses are a major concern, with Rocky Mountain spotted fever topping the list each year.  Other tick-borne illnesses found in Chatham include Lyme disease, Southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI), and ehrlichiosis.  Summer is fast approaching and people are spending more time outdoors, so it is important for everyone to take precautions to protect against tick bites.

What can you do to protect yourself from these dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases? The North Carolina Division of Public Health encourages the following activities to help protect against illness caused by ticks:

*   Avoid tick habitats, which includes wooded, grassy, or brushy areas.
*   If you can’t avoid a tick habitat, use tick repellent and wear light-colored clothing, long sleeves, and long pants.  Tuck your pants legs into your socks.
*   Check yourself and your kids for ticks when returning from being outdoors. Be especially watchful around the waist, the groin, and the neck.
*   If you see an attached tick, carefully remove it by grasping the tick with fine-tipped tweezers as close as possible to your skin and apply a steady gentle pressure until it releases. The Chatham County Public Health Department has tick kits available that include tweezers and important information related to ticks.
*   After safely removing the tick, document the location of attachment, the day the tick was removed, photograph or save the tick by taping it to an index card so it may be identified if you fall ill, and watch for signs of illness such as rash or fever.  If you experience these symptoms, see your health care provider and let them know you were recently bitten by a tick

While it is not possible to prevent all cases of tick-borne illness, you can greatly reduce your risk by following these basic control measures.

To learn more about ticks or to watch videos of the Tick Forum presentations, visit www.chathamnc.org/ticks.

As tick activity increases, Chatham County Public Health Department hosts tick forum appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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