Books – Chatham Journal Newspaper http://chathamjournal.com Experience the World of Chatham County, NC Tue, 23 Jan 2018 02:59:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://i1.wp.com/chathamjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/10888465-four-newspaper-pile-isolated-on-white-background-Stock-Vector-newspaper-icon-headline-5580d7a0v1_site_icon.png?fit=32%2C32 Books – Chatham Journal Newspaper http://chathamjournal.com 32 32 Experience the World of Chatham County, NC Books – Chatham Journal Newspaper Experience the World of Chatham County, NC Books – Chatham Journal Newspaper http://chathamjournal.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://chathamjournal.com/category/arts-entertainment/books/ TV-G 63016882 One on One: Jim Martin on science and religion http://chathamjournal.com/2017/07/10/one-one-jim-martin-science-religion/ Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:38:49 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7797 By D.G. Martin Chapel Hill, NC – Can a former North Carolina governor bridge the gap between science and religion? Jim Martin gives it a try in a new book, “Revelation Through Science: Evolution in the Harmony of Science and…

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By D.G. Martin

D.G. MartinChapel Hill, NC – Can a former North Carolina governor bridge the gap between science and religion?

Jim Martin gives it a try in a new book, “Revelation Through Science: Evolution in the Harmony of Science and Religion.”

Why would he want to take on the task of showing that the discoveries of science pose no threat to Christianity or any other religion?

Martin is a Davidson and Princeton trained chemist. He is a champion of the scientific method and, without apology, endorses the discoveries his fellow scientists have made, including the Big Bang theory of the origin of the universe and basics of the theory of evolution.

He is also the son of a Presbyterian minister and himself a lifelong Christian. He believes the Bible is “the received word of God, the Creator and Sustainer of the universe and of any life it holds, on earth or elsewhere. I believe the Bible is our best guide to faith and practice.

“I believe there is, and can be, no irreconcilable conflict between science and religion, for they are revealed from the same God. Even more than that, as a Christian, I believe that God is most clearly revealed in the life and teaching of Jesus Christ. Furthermore, I firmly believe that a loving God intended us to have the capacity to observe and interpret nature, so that we would grow in understanding the majesty and mystery of His creation and all that followed.”

revelation through scienceHow can Martin reconcile his scientific truths with the biblical account of a six-day creation or with the related belief that the earth was created about six thousand years ago?

He admits that he would sometimes avoid discussion of these questions when he was involved in electoral politics. For instance, as governor he visited the small town of Hobucken on Pamlico Sound. He stopped at the local fishing supply store at R. E. Mayo Company and saw a “monstrous skeletal whale head standing right outside the store.”

Martin remarked to some of the local people, “Wow! That whale must have lived and died there millions of years ago!”

Martin says that everything got quiet. Then, one person responded, “No, sir, we reckon she couldn’t have been there more’n six thousand years!”

“No,” Martin writes, “I did not stand my ground and debate the age of the earth with these fine gentlemen. I knew what I knew, part of which was that they knew what they knew, and this debate was not winnable.”

Now Martin is ready, not to debate, but to explain that science’s conclusions about the time of creation (13.7 billion years ago) and the age of the earth (4.5 billion years ago) are firmly based. More importantly for him, they are not in conflict with religion, including the creation accounts in the book of Genesis.

In his 400-page book, he lays out a seminar for the “educated non-scientist,” explaining the awesome complexities and orderliness of our world. He gives details of the sciences of astronomy, physics, biology, evolution, geology, paleontology, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and genomics, including efforts to spark living organisms from inert chemicals.

With every scientific advance or explanation of how the world came about and works now, Martin says there is a further revelation from the Creator.

Does he assert that these advances prove the existence of God?

No, but throughout the book he points out what he calls “anthropic coincidences” that made for a universe that “was physically and chemically attuned very precisely for the emergence of life, culminating thus far in an intelligent, self-aware species.”

If the discussions of science and religion are too complicated for some readers, they should not put down the book before reading its final chapter in which Martin describes his personal journey of faith, study, service, and tolerance and respect for the opinions of those who see things differently.

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D.G. Martin hosts “North Carolina Bookwatch,” which airs Sundays at noon and Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UNC-TV. Preview the upcoming program on UNC-TV’s North Carolina Channel (over the air and on Time Warner #1276) on Fridays at 8 p.m. To view prior programs: http://video.unctv.org/ program/nc-bookwatch/episodes/

For upcoming programs: www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch

This Thursday’s (July 12) guest is Kevin Adams, author of “North Carolina Waterfalls.” Next week’s (July 16, 20) guest is Elizabeth Cox, author of “A Question of Mercy.”

Thursday 5pm July 12 Kevin Adams, author of “North Carolina Waterfalls” 

Sunday noon July 16 and Thursday 5pm July 19 Elizabeth Cox, author of “A Question of Mercy” 

Sunday noon July 23 and Thursday 5pm July 27 William Ferris, author of “The South In Color” 

Sunday noon July 30 and Thursday 5pm August 3 Angela Pisel, author of “With Love From the Inside” 

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One on One: Four books to entertain and disturb you during summer vacation http://chathamjournal.com/2017/07/04/one-one-four-books-entertain-disturb-summer-vacation/ Tue, 04 Jul 2017 14:17:57 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7736 By D.G. Martin Chapel Hill, NC – If you are willing to be both entertained and disturbed by your summer vacation books, I have four new volumes for your consideration: two books by important photographers and two literary mysteries that raise…

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By D.G. Martin

D.G. MartinChapel Hill, NC – If you are willing to be both entertained and disturbed by your summer vacation books, I have four new volumes for your consideration: two books by important photographers and two literary mysteries that raise important public policy issues.

First the photographs.

If you grew up in the rural South of yesteryear and remember the landscapes, the crops, the tractors, the people, the country stores and churches, you will identify with UNC-Chapel Hill Professor William Ferris’s book, “The South in Color: A Visual Journal.” In the introduction Ferris writes, “As a photographer of the American South, I sought the Holy Grail—that single image that captures the region in its fullest, most engaging expression.”

His 100 color photographs document life in the South while he was growing up in the latter half of the last century.  The striking photos of ordinary scenes include farm fields, families, and churches. Lovely, but they also disturb as they illustrate the racial divisions that characterized the South. His beautiful and unsettling images mark Ferris as a true artist with an important message.

Earlier editions of Waynesville’s Kevin Adams’s “North Carolina Waterfalls” sold more than 65,000 copies. That is an amazing report, but easier to understand when the reader and viewer see his photographs of hundreds of our state’s enchanting waterfalls and read his detailed and compelling descriptions of the falls, how Adams approached his task, and the dangers to these treasures from human activity.

North Carolina WaterfallsAdams teaches nature photography seminars and leads popular waterfall photography tours. He is the author and photographer of a series of earlier books about scenic Western North Carolina. His new edition of  “North Carolina Waterfalls” includes 300 full color waterfall profiles and, in addition, 700 descriptions of other nearby falls. Adams writes. “The two years I worked on this project were grueling, but they reminded me just how much North Carolina’s waterfalls are in my bloodstream.”

The resulting combination of lovely photography and accompanying background information makes for a classic.

Now, the question-raising fiction.

In award-winning poet, novelist and former Duke professor Elizabeth Cox’s latest novel, “A Question of Mercy,” actions of a mentally challenged teenaged boy begin to frighten other children and alarm their parents. Set in the North Carolina of the early 1950s, we learn the family’s side of this situation through the voice of Jess Booker, the teenaged stepsister of Adam, who suffers from a disabling mental condition.

A question of mercyAt first, Jess is Adam’s unwilling and uncomfortable caregiver. Then she warms to Adam and becomes his advocate, arguing against her stepmother’s determination to send him to a state institution where he would be subject to radical medical treatments including lobotomy and sterilization. As Adam comes to understand what is in store for him, he becomes desperately sad. After a walk with Jess along the French Broad River, Adam disappears. When Adam’s body is found downriver, Jess, who has run away on a long journey of her own, becomes a murder suspect, and the novel’s story becomes, in part, a murder mystery.

with love from the insideThe central character of Hickory’s Angela Pisel’s debut novel, “With Love from the Inside,” is Grace Bradshaw. She knows the exact minute she will die. On death row for murdering her infant son, her last breath will be taken on February 15 at 12:01 a.m. Out of appeals, she can focus on only one thing—reconnecting with her daughter Sophie, who has moved on to a new life, convinced that her mother was guilty. Over time Sophie learns facts that show her mother was innocent and unfairly convicted. With the help of her mother’s lawyer, Sophie fights against all obstacles to stop the execution. Whether she succeeds or not, her life is forever changed, as will be the lives of many readers who will be moved by Pisel’s poignant debut.

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D.G. Martin hosts “North Carolina Bookwatch,” which airs Sundays at noon and Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UNC-TV. Preview the upcoming program on UNC-TV’s North Carolina digital channel  (Spectrum #1276) on Fridays at 8 p.m.

This Thursday’s (July 6) guest is Southern Book Prize Finalist Vivian Howard, author of “Deep Run Roots.”

Next week’s (July 9, July 12) guest is Kevin Adams, author of “North Carolina Waterfalls.”

To view prior programs: http://video.unctv.org/program/nc-bookwatch/episodes/

For upcoming programs: www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch

Sunday noon July 2 and Thursday 5pm July 6 Vivian Howard, author of “Deep Run Roots” 

Sunday noon July 9 and Thursday 5pm July 12 Kevin Adams, author of “North Carolina Waterfalls” 

Sunday noon July 16 and Thursday 5pm July 20 Elizabeth Cox, author of “A Question of Mercy” 

Sunday noon July 23 and Thursday 5pm July 27 William Ferris, author of “The South In Color” 

Sunday noon July 30 and Thursday 5pm August 3 Angela Pisel, author of “With Love From the Inside” 

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This week at Chatham County Libraries – Week of June 26, 2017 http://chathamjournal.com/2017/06/26/week-chatham-county-libraries-week-june-26-2017/ Mon, 26 Jun 2017 15:26:59 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7689 Pittsboro, NC – Here is a rundown of the events taking place at this week at Chatham County Libraries. Tuesday, June 27 10am                          Preschool Story Time 11am-12pm  …

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Pittsboro, NC – Here is a rundown of the events taking place at this week at Chatham County Libraries.

Tuesday, June 27
10am                          Preschool Story Time
11am-12pm              CCL Summer Reading Program – Come join us for a Summer Reading activity or craft pertaining to this year’s theme of  Build A Better World!

Wednesday, June 28
1-2pm                         Wellness Wednesdays for Kids. Every Wednesday at 1:00 we will be hosting a mover and some shakers; local dance instructors, yogis and personal trainers will be sharing a movement based activity that will get the whole family moving. Classes will be at the Chatham Community Library in the Holmes Meeting Room. Today’s activity for the kids is with Heather D’Arnell from Siler City Dance & Gymnastics Academy. “Students will learn a short hip-hop dance, experiment with breakdancing, and end the class with some fun rhythm games.”

Thursday, June 29
9am-12pm                 Genealogy Assistance- Volunteer genealogists are available to assist with family history research, whether your ancestors lived in Chatham County, the 50 states, or overseas.  A genealogist is on site in the library most Thursdays from 9:00 am to noon, and other days and times by appointment. Call 919-545-8086 to make an appointment. Sessions take place in the Local History & Genealogy area of Chatham Community Library.  Please bring as much written documentation as you have about the topic you are researching, as well as a flash drive for saving documents and/or money for printing.
1pm                            Cool Off with a Movie! It’s Summer time and on these hot days you can get in from the heat and cool off with a movie! Every Thursday at 1:00 at Chatham Community Library we will be showing a family friendly movie. Today’s showing is: March of the Penguins.

Friday, June 30
9:30am                           Toddler Story Time
10:30am                         Preschool Story Time
3:30pm                           Summer Reading Performer: Capital Balloon Studios at CCL. Building Your Future, Inflate Your Mind! Free Children’s   Reading Empowerment Show Using Balloons, Magic, & Comedy. For more information contact Youth Services at 919-545-8085.

Wren Library, Siler City
Monday, June 26
4pm                              Afternoon Movies at Wren. Come enjoy a Free afternoon movie at Wren! Today’s showing is: Storks

Wednesday, June 28
10:30am                           Story Time
11:30am & 12:30pm      Wren Summer Reading Program. Come join us for a Summer Reading activity or craft pertaining to this year’s theme of Build A Better World!

Friday, June 30
12pm                                Summer Reading Performer: Capital Balloon Studios at CCL. Building Your Future, Inflate Your Mind! Free Children’s    Reading Empowerment Show Using Balloons, Magic, & Comedy. For more information contact Youth Services at 919-545-8085.

Goldston Library, Goldston
Thursday, June 29
10:30am                        Story Time for all ages
11:30am                        Goldston Summer Reading Program. Come join us for a Summer Reading activity or craft pertaining to this year’s   theme of Build A Better World!

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One on One: A North Carolina mountain woman’s adventure in Bulgaria http://chathamjournal.com/2017/04/23/one-one-north-carolina-mountain-womans-adventure-bulgaria/ Sun, 23 Apr 2017 06:40:58 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7618 By D.G. Martin Chapel Hill, NC – Why would North Carolinian Elizabeth Kostova, who is a New York Times No.1 bestselling author, set her action-packed novel in Bulgaria? I will give you an answer in a minute. But first, a…

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By D.G. Martin

D.G. MartinChapel Hill, NC – Why would North Carolinian Elizabeth Kostova, who is a New York Times No.1 bestselling author, set her action-packed novel in Bulgaria?

I will give you an answer in a minute. But first, a little bit about her new book, “The Shadow Land.”

Its main character is a young North Carolina mountain woman, Alexandra Boyd. On her first day in the country she meets a small Bulgarian family group. They tell her they are on the way to a beautiful monastery and suggest she consider visiting it later. After they part ways, Alexandra finds that she has a satchel that belongs to the Bulgarian group.

A young taxi driver called Bobby befriends her as she seeks to find the satchel’s owners. In the satchel is a wooden urn, containing ashes and inscribed with the name Stoyan Lazarov.

She and Bobby report the incident to the local police. They give them an address for Lazarov.

Elizabeth Kostova Shadow LandFirst, they rush to the monastery and search for the Bulgarian group, but find no one. As they prepare to leave, they realize that they have been locked in a room. Alexandra thinks, “nothing in her previous experience had prepared her for the feeling of being suddenly locked in a monastic room with a stranger five thousand miles from the Blue Ridge Mountains, holding an urn containing the ashes of another stranger. In addition to being tired and afraid, she was suddenly a thief, a vagrant and a prisoner.”

Although they escape from the monastery, they cannot escape a growing awareness that they are being followed and that possessing this urn has put them in danger.

Nevertheless, the next day they go to the address the police had provided. The house is empty of people, but photos and papers there confirm that the urn’s owners had lived there. A neighbor gave them another address elsewhere in Bulgaria.

Before they leave town, they adopt a stray dog, which becomes an important character with a major role in one of the concluding scenes. Kostova introduces other people, including an older, wealthy businessman-turned-politician named Kurilkov and known as “The Bear.” He is seeking to win the next election on the promise of “non-corruption.”

There are growing and inexplicable dangers: vandalized cars, threats, murder and kidnapping. Only if the urn contains some valuable secret can there be an explanation for this unsettling situation.

An explanation of the urn’s secret and its dangerous value becomes the spine on which Kostova builds the book’s surprising and violent resolution.

On that same spine she attaches another story, that of Stoyan Lazarov, a talented violinist, lover of Vivaldi, loving husband and father, who ran afoul of Bulgaria’s post-World War II brutal communist dictatorship. He was confined for many years in a torturous labor camp where work conditions and weather almost killed him and destroyed his health and his prospects for a fulfilling musical career.

At the work camp, he met two men, one a friend and fellow inmate, and the other a guard who becomes a heated enemy. Both characters play a major part in the book’s dramatic conclusion.

Why then did Kostova set this book in Bulgaria? Explaining her fascination for that nation, she writes about her first visit, when she first came to “this mysterious country, hidden for so long behind the Iron Curtain,” and she felt, “I had somehow come home.”

Kostova’s novel takes her readers on a tour of Bulgaria, its mountains, its cities and villages its forests and seashores. Her poetic descriptions of Bulgaria’s landscapes and people made this reader want to see for myself the country she loves so much.

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D.G. Martin hosts “North Carolina Bookwatch,” which airs Sundays at noon and Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UNC-TV. Preview the upcoming program on Preview the upcoming program on UNC-TV’s North Carolina digital channel  (Spectrum-Time Warner #1276) on Fridays at 8 p.m.

This week’s (April 23, 27) guests ware Richard Rosen and Joseph Mosnier, authors of “Julius Chambers: A Life in the Legal Struggle for Civil Rights.”

To view prior programs: http://video.unctv.org/program/nc-bookwatch/episodes/

For upcoming programs: www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch

Sunday noon April 23 and Thursday 5pm April 27 Richard Rosen and Joseph Mosnier, authors of “Julius Chambers: A Life in the Legal Struggle for Civil Rights”

Sunday noon April 30 and Thursday 5pm May 4 Matthew Griffin, author of “Hide”

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Day of the Books festival at Bray Park on April 29 http://chathamjournal.com/2017/04/07/day-books-april-29/ Fri, 07 Apr 2017 13:26:56 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7541 Siler City, NC – Chatham County Partnership for Children invites the community to the Day of the Books, a family celebration of literacy, multiculturalism and the arts. Also known as El Día de los Libros, this bilingual festival is built…

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Siler City, NC – Chatham County Partnership for Children invites the community to the Day of the Books, a family celebration of literacy, multiculturalism and the arts. Also known as El Día de los Libros, this bilingual festival is built on the “Children’s Day” holiday celebrated in many parts of Latin America.

This family festival will be held at Bray Park in Siler City, on April 29 from 10 am to 2 pm. Children will enjoy painting, music, dance, face painting, and storytelling, all free of charge. Each child will take home one free brand-new English-Spanish bilingual book and a handful of gently used books of their choice.

Major contributors and sponsors for this event are ChathamArts, Smart Start, Chatham County Schools, Friends of the Chatham Community Library, Chatham Reads, Central Carolina Community College, and Chatham Literacy.

This project is supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources. The North Carolina Arts Council works to make North Carolina The Creative State where a robust arts industry produces a creative economy, vibrant communities, children prepared for the 21st century and lives filled with discovery and learning. The Arts Council accomplishes this in partnership with artists and arts organizations, other organizations that use the arts to make their communities stronger and North Carolinians-young and old-who enjoy and participate in the arts. The Arts Council is a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources.

North Carolina has long been recognized for rich traditions in crafts, literature, historical drama, and music. Since 1964, the N.C. Arts Council has worked to strengthen North Carolina’s creativity, invention, and prosperity through its four core functions: creating a strong and efficient arts infrastructure across North Carolina; planning and implementing economic development initiatives; educating our young people; and researching the impact of the arts on our state. ncarts.org

The Day of the Books festivities will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. In case of rain, the festival will be held at Virginia Cross Elementary School.

For more information, call 919-542-6644 ext. 12 or email *protected email* .

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One on One: Losing Diane Rehm http://chathamjournal.com/2017/03/21/one-one-losing-diane-rehm/ Tue, 21 Mar 2017 20:59:31 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7436 by D.G. Martin Chapel Hill, NC – Diane Rehm’s scheduled visit to Elon University on April 6 is reminding fans of her public radio program how much they miss her since her retirement at the beginning of this year. For…

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by D.G. Martin

D.G. MartinChapel Hill, NC – Diane Rehm’s scheduled visit to Elon University on April 6 is reminding fans of her public radio program how much they miss her since her retirement at the beginning of this year.

For 37 years her morning talk show made her one of America’s most influential people. Her program attracted smart and articulate guests from diverse points of view. Her respectful, sometimes halting questions, prompted conversation that challenged her listeners to reassess their positions on important issues.

When she faced a personal health battle with a rare neurological disorder, spasmodic dysphonia, something that affected her voice and threatened her career, she prevailed and made her unique voice a signature asset and an inspiration for others.

In her recent book, “On My Own,” Rehm deals with other challenges she has faced, including the long, gradual decline and eventual death of her husband, John.

Dealing with his death and her pending retirement, she wrote,  “I began to wonder about my own transitions, not only from married woman to widow but also from national radio talk-show host to … who knows what?”

Rehm’s poignant story of her husband’s gradual dying process touches readers’ heartstrings and, at the same time, shouts out an important and controversial public policy challenge.

Diane Rehm On My OwnHer book begins, “On June 14, 2014, my husband, John Rehm–age eighty-three–began his withdrawal from life. The aides at Brighton Gardens were instructed to stop bringing medications, menus, or water.”

Later in the book she describes how John’s illness, Parkinson’s, gradually took away his ability to care for himself, even with Diane’s help. She describes the pain both felt when it came time for him to move from their apartment into an extended care facility. She writes, “One of the first feelings that strikes me is Guilt, with a capital G. I’ve wrestled with my conscience and the conviction that I should have taken care of John myself during his final year and a half. But that would have meant giving up my career, and I wasn’t ready to do that. And John wouldn’t have wanted me to do that.”

But, she continues, “There are moments when the feelings of guilt are overwhelming.”

Every spouse and every child who has guided a declining family member away from the home that was a loving base knows those feelings of guilt. Knowing that Diane Rehm has gone through the same sad experience will bring comfort to many readers.

As John’s condition deteriorated and he could do nothing for himself, he wanted to die and sought a way to end his life. He told his physician “that because Parkinson’s disease had so affected him that he no longer had the use of his hands, arms, or legs, because he could no longer stand, walk, eat, bathe, or in any way care for himself on his own, he was now ready to die.”

But when he asked his doctor to help with drugs that would simply “put him to sleep,” his doctor told him that state law in Maryland would not allow it. John was angry. His doctor explained that he could bring about his own death within a couple of weeks by stopping eating and drinking.

John followed that pathway, and death came, just not at a time when Diane and their children were with him.

Diane is still angry.  She writes, “I rage at a system that would not allow John to be helped toward his own death.”

Not all of her fans will agree with her controversial advocacy for laws permitting medically assisted suicide. But all of them will be grateful for her moving description of the loss of her husband and how it put her “On My Own.”

Diane Rehm will talk with D.G. Martin about her new book and her retirement from “The Diane Rehm” show at Elon University at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 6. For ticket information call  (336) 278-5610.

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D.G. Martin hosts “North Carolina Bookwatch,” which airs Sundays at noon and Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UNC-TV. Preview the upcoming program on UNC-TV’s North Carolina digital channel  (Time Warner #1276) on Fridays at 8 p.m.

This Thursday’s (March 23) guest is Pat Conroy, author of “The Death of Santini.” Next week’s (March 26, 30) guest is Ralph Hardy, author of “Argos: The Story of Odysseus as Told by His Loyal Dog.”

 

 

 

Thursday 5pm March 23 Pat Conroy author of “The Death of Santini”

Sunday noon March 26 and Thursday 5pm March 30 Ralph Hardy, author of “Argos”

Sunday noon April 2 and Thursday 5pm April 6 Renee Ahdieh, author of “The Rose & The Dagger”

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Celebrate Independent Bookstore Day on Saturday, April 29 http://chathamjournal.com/2017/03/16/celebrate-independent-bookstore-day-saturday-april-29/ Thu, 16 Mar 2017 16:35:18 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7404 Pittsboro, NC – Celebrate Independent Bookstore Day on Saturday, April 29, 2017. The Chatham County bookstore participating is McIntyre’s Books, Fearrington Village, 220 Market Street Pittsboro, NC. 27312. During the month of April, visit McIntyre’s Books or all of the…

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Pittsboro, NC – Celebrate Independent Bookstore Day on Saturday, April 29, 2017. The Chatham County bookstore participating is McIntyre’s Books, Fearrington Village, 220 Market Street Pittsboro, NC. 27312.

McIntyre's Book StoreDuring the month of April, visit McIntyre’s Books or all of the 12 Independent Booksellers of Piedmont North Carolina (IBOP*NC) to get your field guide map stamped for a chance to win prizes. Special programming, merchandise and giveaways are planned at each store on the last Saturday of April.

IBOP*NC is dedicated to promoting reading and creating community across central North Carolina. IBOP*NC is part of a larger, national effort to recognize and celebrate independent bookstores nationwide.

The bookstores, listed below, are members of the Independent Booksellers of Piedmont North Carolina. Follow the link to each of their websites to learn more about what they are doing in their stores to celebrate Independent Bookstore Day.

McIntyre’s Books, Fearrington Village, 220 Market Street Pittsboro, NC. 27312
Bookmarks, 251 N. Spruce Street, Winston-Salem, NC 27101
The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, NC 28387
Flyleaf Books, 752 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd (Historic Airport Rd), Chapel Hill, NC 27514
Letters Bookshop 313 W Main St, Durham, NC 27701
Page 158 Books, 158 S. White Street, Wake Forest, NC 27587
Purple Crow, 109 W King St, Hillsborough, NC 27278
Quail Ridge Books, North Hills, 4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road, Raleigh, NC 27609
Read With Me, 111 E Hargett St #110, Raleigh, NC 27601
Regulator Bookshop, 720 Ninth Street, Durham, NC 27705
Scuppernong Books, 304 S Elm St, Greensboro, NC 27401
Sunrise Books, 7 Hillcrest Pl, High Point, NC 27262

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Friends of the Chatham Community Library will hold its annual Spring Book Sale April 6, 7 and 8 http://chathamjournal.com/2017/03/06/friends-chatham-community-library-will-hold-annual-spring-book-sale-april-6-7-8/ Mon, 06 Mar 2017 20:19:58 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7360 Pittsboro, NC – The Friends of the Chatham Community Library (FotCCL) will hold its Spring Book Sale on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, April 6, 7 and 8, at the library on the campus of Central Carolina Community College in Pittsboro,…

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Pittsboro, NC – The Friends of the Chatham Community Library (FotCCL) will hold its Spring Book Sale on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, April 6, 7 and 8, at the library on the campus of Central Carolina Community College in Pittsboro, NC.

Hours of the sale are Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free, and purchases may be made by cash or check — but no credit cards are accepted.

More than 17,000 hardbound and softbound books, and more, will be available for purchase. The sale offers a completely new assortment of titles in very good to excellent condition, and all are organized by category, subject or format.

On Thursday, the first day of the sale, most hardcover books are $3; trade paperbacks are $2; and small paperbacks are 50¢ ⎯ plus purchases of $200 or more are entitled to a 20% discount. On Friday, all books and materials are half price, and on Saturday customers may fill grocery bags with books they choose for $5 each with no limit to the number of bags filled. Bags are available free, compliments of local food stores.

Also on Saturday, audio-visual items including DVDs, CDs, LPs and audio books will be sold separately at special prices.

Members of the Friends of the Chatham Community Library receive a discount card worth $3, including all those who join at the book sale, and the discount may be used on any day of the sale.

A popular feature of the Friends book sale is Claudia’s Corner, which offers rare, noteworthy or special books starting at $10. These books are in a special room and priced at no more than a quarter to a third of their lowest value online. A listing of these books may be found on the FotCCL Website at friendsccl.org/booksale.htm.

The Friends book sale is held in the Holmes Family Meeting Room of the library, which is located at 197 NC Highway 87 North in Pittsboro, about a half mile north of US Highway 64 Business (West Street). There is ample free parking at the library and adjacent college, plus volunteers to assist with carrying out and loading books.
Proceeds from the book sale are used to benefit the library for underwriting various programs; purchasing needed books, materials and equipment; and improving its technology and services.
More information about the book sale, including membership in the Friends and volunteer opportunities, may be found on the FotCCL Website at www.friendsccl.org.

 

Friends of the Chatham Community Library will hold its annual Spring Book Sale April 6, 7 and 8 appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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One on One: The Wilmington Ten and the Women’s March on Washington http://chathamjournal.com/2017/02/01/one-one-wilmington-ten-womens-march-washington/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 21:33:01 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7244 By D.G. Martin Chapel Hill, NC  – “The case of the Wilmington Ten amounts to one of the most egregious instances of injustice and political repression from the post–World War II black freedom struggle. It took legions of people working…

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One on One: The Wilmington Ten and the Women’s March on Washington appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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By D.G. Martin

D.G. MartinChapel Hill, NC  – “The case of the Wilmington Ten amounts to one of the most egregious instances of injustice and political repression from the post–World War II black freedom struggle. It took legions of people working over the course of the 1970s to right the wrong.”

These opening words from Kenneth Janken’s book, “The Wilmington Ten: Violence, Injustice, and the Rise of Black Politics in the 1970s,” alert readers to the importance of the story he tells and to the passionate viewpoint from which he writes.

In today’s times of Black Lives Matter and the Women’s March on Washington, why is the Wilmington Ten story important for us?

One reason according to the Wilmington StarNews journalist Ben Steelman is “the Wilmington Ten case still divides Wilmington like an ugly scar.”

That story begins in 1971 when the treatment of black students in Wilmington’s newly integrated high schools prompted a boycott and demonstrations, followed by violent confrontations and the burning of small businesses. It ended only on December 31, 2012 when Governor Beverly Perdue issued a pardon of innocence for 10 people who had been charged and convicted of arson and related crimes in connection with the 1971 burnings.

Janken sets out the tortured story that took place between those two dates.

*Since no other nearby black church was willing to host the boycotters’ potentially inflammatory demonstrations, they established their headquarters at a mixed race United Church of Christ church led by white pastor, Eugene Templeton.

*When boycott and protest efforts were faltering, Templeton asked his denomination to send someone to provide leadership training for the protesting students. The person they sent was the charismatic Ben Chavis, who had been active in demonstrations in Oxford and in other eastern North Carolina towns.

*After Chavis arrived, confrontations among demonstrators, white power groups, and law enforcement officials accelerated. On the night of February 6-7, 1971, Mike’s Grocery was destroyed by fire.

*A year later in March, 1972, Chavis and others associated with the boycotts and demonstrations were arrested and charged with arson.

*Using perjured testimony that he helped develop, the prosecutor secured a conviction of the 10 defendants known as the Wilmington Ten. The group was sentenced to a cumulative total of 282 years.

*Janken asserts that the prosecution had broad support from political and community leaders who wanted to prevent Chavis from stirring up more demonstrations in Wilmington and other parts of the state.

*Early appeals of the conviction and sentencing on the grounds of prosecutorial and judicial misconduct were unsuccessful.

*Many in North Carolina believed that Chavis and others in the group were guilty of something, even if they did not put a match to Mike’s Grocery. But people in other parts of the country and in many other lands took up the cause of the Wilmington Ten. These groups pummeled North Carolina with petitions and demonstrations.  They cast a negative shadow on our state, something similar to the one cast today by House Bill 2. These activities also mobilized and provided an organizational vehicle for supporters of other progressive causes just as the Women’s March on Washington did this year on January 21.

*In January 1979, Gov. Jim Hunt shortened the sentences of the Wilmington Ten, leaving some of them still in prison.

*In 1980 a federal appeals court threw out all convictions.

Janken believes the memories of the 1898 Wilmington violent political revolution that ousted black officials had an impact on the activities of 1971, and particularly the unwillingness of some leading members of the black community to support the student boycott. Similarly, the Wilmington Ten story is for many, a flashpoint of history that will burn for many years to come.

Wilmington Ten book

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D.G. Martin hosts “North Carolina Bookwatch,” which airs Sundays at noon and Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UNC-TV. Preview the upcoming program on Preview the upcoming program on UNC-TV’s North Carolina digital channel  (Time Warner #1276) on Fridays at 8 p.m.

This Thursday’s (February 2) guest is Nina DeGramont, author of “The Last September.” (Next week’s (February 5, 9) guests are Carole Boston Weatherford & Jeffery Weatherford, authors of “You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen.”

To view prior programs: http://video.unctv.org/program/nc-bookwatch/episodes/

For upcoming programs: www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch

Thursday 5pm January Nina DeGramont author of “The Last September” 

Sunday noon February 5 and Thursday 5pm February 9 Carole Boston Weatherford & Jeffery Weatherford, authors of “You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen.”

Sunday noon February 12 and Thursday 5pm February 16 Fred Chappell, author of “A Shadow All of Light”

Sunday noon February 19 and Thursday 5pm February 23 Sara Foster, author of “Foster’s Market Favorites: 25th Anniversary,”

Sunday noon February 26 and Thursday 5pm March 2 Tony Early, author of “Mr. Tall”

One on One: The Wilmington Ten and the Women’s March on Washington appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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Horton Middle School commemorating namesake on February 27 http://chathamjournal.com/2017/02/01/horton-middle-school-commemorating-namesake/ Wed, 01 Feb 2017 21:00:39 +0000 http://chathamjournal.com/?p=7240 Pittsboro, NC – Born into slavery but determined to read, George Moses Horton shook the shackles that kept black people illiterate and published a book of poetry, becoming the first African-American to do so. Horton lived in Chatham between 1798…

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Horton Middle School commemorating namesake on February 27 appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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Pittsboro, NC – Born into slavery but determined to read, George Moses Horton shook the shackles that kept black people illiterate and published a book of poetry, becoming the first African-American to do so. Horton lived in Chatham between 1798 and 1884.

Horton Middle School bears his name, and students and staff there will celebrate his story on campus (79 S. Horton Rd.) February 27 at 8:45 a.m.  Author and illustrator Don Tate shares his engaging  book, “Poet: The Remarkable Life of George Moses Horton.”

This inaugural gathering will underscore Horton’s historical significance to the school’s community, Horton Middle principal Valencia Toomer said. Those attending should reserve spots by either calling 919-542-2303 or visiting the school’s website at chatham.k12.nc.us/hms.

Horton Middle School commemorating namesake on February 27 appeared first on Chatham Journal Newspaper.

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